Station Pier
Melbourne's Cruise Ship Terminal

Station Pier's Heritage Listed Gate HouseStation Pier was originally known as Railway Pier and was first opened in 1854. It played a key role in Victoria's history and through the mid to late 1800's saw the arrival of the first visitors keen to seek their fortunes on the goldfields and then the settlers. It saw off the first contingent of Australian troops headed for the Boer War. In October 1914 16 ships left Station Pier for World War I. Again in 1940 troops headed for the European, African and Pacific theatres of World War II from Station Pier. Post the Second World War many thousands of the migrants that came to Australia's shores and gave Melbourne its rich multicultural diversity first set foot on Australian soil at Station Pier. The pier and its unique Gate House are heritage listed.
Today Station Pier is Melbourne's premier cruise ship terminal and is also host to the Spirit of Tasmania ferry service from Melbourne to Devonport. It also plays host to visiting naval and tall ships. Unlike many cruise ship terminals, Station Pier is not located within a freight terminal. The pier is constructed directly off the beach into Port Phillip Bay at the historic and cosmopolitan suburb of Port Melbourne, giving visitors stunning views from their ship and the chance to wander along the beach side board walks directly from the end of the pier.
Station Pier is 15 minutes from Melbourne's CBD.
The pier is open to the general public from 6am to 9pm daily (for pedestrians only). However, the pier is closed to the public during cruise ship visits, some naval ship visits and other exceptional circumstances.

Accessibility
Terminal Building

During cruise ship visits entry to the pier is via the left side gate for initial security. The path down the pier is level and smooth with a road crossing about half way down to the cruise terminal. The cruise terminal is the second building on the pier and there is a set of elevators just past the main escalators. The terminal is on the first floor with a small cafe accessible toilets, and a gift shop prior to the main security checkpoint and gangway entry. The tidal movement in Port Phillip bay is only approximately 18 inches, gangway slope will alter greatly during your visit. Depending on the ship and gangway configuration assistance is on hand for wheelchair users.

Access to the City
Beacon Cove Wheelchair Accessible Tram StopThere are two public transport options to the CBD. There is an accessible free shuttle bus that operates on weekdays from the cruise terminal to the arts precinct in the city near the Flinders Street Station.
An accessible tram service (route 109) operates from the Beacon Cove terminus right into the centre of the centre with stops along Collins Street. Route 109 operates flat floor roll in trams from elevated tram platforms. Each platform has a 1 in 14 ramp at one end for wheelchair users. The accessible stops are:

  • 8-Parliament/Collins St (Melbourne City)
  • 7-101 Collins St (Melbourne City)
  • 6-Melbourne Town Hall/Collins St (Melbourne City)
  • 5-Elizabeth St/Collins St (Melbourne City)
  • 1-Spencer St/Collins St (Melbourne City)
  • 124A-Casino/MCEC/Clarendon St (Southbank)
  • 129-Beacon Cove/Light Rail (Port Melbourne)

The Tram terminus is a pleasant 10 minute walk/roll from the cruise terminal. On Cruise visiting days an accessible bus shuttle operates from the terminal to the Beacon Cove terminus.

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